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held a hearing on fema's response to hurricane sandy. senators from new york, rhode island, connecticut and delaware testified before the committee on the challenges their constituents face in the aftermath of the storm and what's needed to move forward. >> good morning, everyone. thank you for joining us for this very important hearing on the response and recovery and the challenges before us to superstorm san joaquin. -- with sandy. we're here today to evaluate the response and recovery effortings in the aftermath of hurricane sandy which struck the northeastern united states on october 29, as the largest-sized storm system in u.s. history. hurricane sandy claimed the lives of more than 120 americans, destroying over 340,000 homes. and over 2 hub,000 businesses and leaving more than 8.5 million families without power, heat or running water for weeks. and i understand in a few neighborhoods and in a few buildings in new york and new jersey that still is the case. the scale of this disaster has created significant housing and transportation challenges and a successful recovery will requ
on of sandy carter. you're probably watching over there in our cube. sandy, thank you for your service and dedication to the people of iowa and the third district. and i could go on and on. back in iowa, there's jay buyers, sally bowser, grant woodard. frequently i would stand before a group and invite train to stand before you as a surrogate son from vietnam, was one of the refugees and what he went through to yet to become an american and have the american dream. very special. so the list is long. i will stop. i know you have travels to do. but those of you in the room, bruce, thank you for your atributes and, jim, it's good to see you again. jim nussle, it's great too sew you. tim, thank you for your remarks and the service we've had together and, tom, i wish you continued success and i know that you believe what's good for our state. we come from the soil, really, and that's probably a good thing. so with that i want to say a fond farewell. i will continue to respond a -- to finally bring this down from 112 to 113, i say it's been my pleasure and my good fortune to live this much
with boutiques, restaurants, and cafes. hurricane sandy was devastating. the hudson river spilled into hoboken from both the north and the south. more than half of the city was flooded. three of the four firehouses and more than 7000 homes were flooded. we estimate the total damage at well over $100 million. thankfully, our main street did not flood and is open for business. even the businesses that did not flood have been severely impacted by one of our principal means of transportation to new york. the train has been flooded and still has not been restored. this is due to the difficulty of getting to and from the city. some were forced to operate at an alternate location as they tried to navigate the insurance got lead. the national flood insurance program is not designed to meet the needs of the urban environment. there is a fundamental unfairness that i respectfully ask congress to try to address. there forced to purchase flood insurance by their mortgage companies. the program treat garden style businesses as if they were basements. the direct uninsured costs are often passed on to the sm
to higher elevations that at more northern latitudes, it's melting glaciers, whether it's hurricane sandy, event after event shows climate change is here. it's real. it's a threat. and we need to reduce our consumption of fossil fuels. wind energy is a tremendous opportunity for us to do that. so if we let the production tax credit expire, we're risking losing manufacturing, we're risking veterans out of work, we're risking climate change. this is something we can't afford as a nation. the production tax credit is a very good investment in america and our future, and our manufacturing base. i urge all of my colleagues to consider helping to extend the production tax credits for our nation for our future. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas, mr. poe, for five minutes. mr. poe: thank you, mr. speaker. according to "the boston globe," chen wu was beaten, choked, punched and held at knifepoint by a chinese national, wong chen, and that was in 2006. her attacker was sent to prison in texas, supposedly never to be heard of again, or so she though
. lawmakers are working on the foreign intelligence surveillance bill and also emerged to funding for sandy recovery efforts. the house and senate standing by to consider any fiscal cliff update. we had an update earlier from a reporter covering the issue. host: let's begin with david lightman. white house. the best sense of what you think the dynamics will be inside the room at the 3:00 p.m. meeting. guest: it wouldn't shock me if we're talking 72 hours from now. the deadline is 11:59 on the 31st. we have seen this on and on. there are five people that know what is going and they are talking. host: let's walk through the scenarios that we can expect. the meeting is at the white house. democrats and republicans. this is the first time they have met since the election. guest: november 16 was the only time they met. it is good news they are talking. are they going to keep talking? will they say, "we will see everybody tomorrow." they would keep talking. what is going to happen on the floors of the house and senate. the senate needs to extend the tax rates a year and amended and that can be do
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5